Galleries & Art Museums: Edward Hopper at CRMA

Centennial Ball, Metropolitan Museum, New York 1969, from Women are Beautiful, c. 1970, by Gary Winogrand (Photo: Rich Sanders, Des Moines, © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco)

DES MOINES ART CENTER 4700 Grand Ave., Des Moines. (515) 277-4405Fink/Winogrand. Larry Fink and Garry Winogrand were both actively taking photographs in New York City in the 1970s. Winogrand primarily made photographs of people on the city streets, while Fink portrayed wealthy Manhattanites at evening cultural events. While their subject matter was different, their photographs are similar in that they employed what was called “the snapshot aesthetic.” Through Mar. 25. The Irrational and the Marvelous. Dada’s use of irrational tactics after WWI paved the way for Surrealism in the 1920s. Artists working in both movements are featured in this exhibition that includes work by Marcel Duchamp, Leonora Carrington, and Dorothea Tanning. Through March 25. Wanderlust: Actions, Traces, Journeys 1967-2017. Exploring the complex nature of artists as voyagers, this survey looks at those who leave the studio to create work. Among the artists featured are John Baldessari, Mona Hatoum, Richard Long, and Ana Mendieta. Feb. 17-May 13.

Detail from Eduoard Duval-Carrie’s Cargo Bounty, 2016, at the Faulconer Gallery

FAULCONER GALLERY, Grinnell College, 1108 Park St, Grinnell. (641) 269-4660. En Voyage: Hybridity and Vodou in Haitian Art. Four paintings by Haitian American artist Edouard Duval-Carrié form the core of an exhibition that focuses on how Haitian art and vodou encapsulate African, European, and indigenous traditions. Through March 18.

From Making Life Visible at the Faulconer: Damien Laudier, Scorpion Blood (2017, photomicrograph, 20 x 16 in., courtesy of the artist)

Making Life Visible: Art, Biology, and Visualization. Contemporary artists and scientists explore different avenues of description. Through Mar. 18.

See a fabulous collection of works by Edward Hopper at the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art. Above, Cobb’s Barns and Distant Houses, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.1206. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art.

CEDAR RAPIDS MUSEUM OF ART, 410 3rd Ave. S.E., Cedar Rapids. (319) 366-7503. Edward Hopper: Selections from the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Thirteen seminal works from the Whitney Museum of American Art trace the early trajectory of Edward Hopper’s career from 1906 to 1933. Hopper is best known for capturing the solitude and isolation of modern American life, and his works include austere interiors, moody cityscapes, and starkly beautiful rural landscapes. Through May 20. Page-Turner: Books and Reading in Art. Books and reading have inspired artists for generations. This exhibition includes objects created out of books, books from artists’ collections, book illustrations, and images of people reading. Through Mar. 31, 2018. Malvina Hoffman: A Sculptor’s Journey. Drawing from the CRMA’s collection of works by 20th century sculptor Malvina Hoffman, this two-gallery exhibition explores her lengthy and varied career as a sculptor. Through Aug. 31, 2018.

ICON GALLERY, 58 N. Main St., Fairfield. (641) 469-6252. Found in Translation. Artists Judy Bales, Suanna Breed, Ananda Kesler, and Joanie McGinnis all create abstract works suggestive of the natural environment without literally depicting it. The title alludes to the translation of artistic media into new and surprising expressions. Through Mar. 24.

DES MOINES ART CENTER 4700 Grand Ave., Des Moines. (515) 277-4405The Irrational and the Marvelous. Dada’s use of irrational tactics after WWI paved the way for Surrealism in the 1920s. Artists working in both movements are featured in this exhibition that includes work by Marcel Duchamp, Leonora Carrington, and Dorothea Tanning. Through March 25. Fink/Winogrand. Larry Fink and Garry Winogrand were both actively taking photographs in New York City in the 1970s. Winogrand primarily made photographs of people on the city streets, while Fink portrayed wealthy Manhattanites at evening cultural events. While their subject matter was different, their photographs are similar in that they employed what was called “the snapshot aesthetic.” Through Mar. 25. Wanderlust: Actions, Traces, Journeys 1967-2017. Exploring the complex nature of artists as voyagers, this survey looks at those who leave the studio to create work. Among the artists featured are John Baldessari, Mona Hatoum, Richard Long, and Ana Mendieta. Feb. 17-May 13.

FIGGE ART MUSEUM, 225 W. 2nd St., Davenport. (563) 326-7804. Wynne Bullock: Revelations. This comprehensive assessment of photographer Wynn Bullock’s (1902-1975) extraordinary career explores his spirit of experimentation with scientific and philosophical endeavors of the day. Bullock used his knowledge of quantum physics, special relativity, and the space-time continuum as a reference point for his own intuitive and personal explorations of the world. Through Apr. 29. Georgia O’Keeffe: Flower Abstraction, 1924. This landmark painting on loan from the Whitney Museum of American Art was painted when O’Keeffe had joined a circle of avant-garde artists centered around gallery owner Alfred Stieglitz. Mar. 2-June 10.

UI MUSEUM OF ART, Iowa Memorial Union, Black Box Theater, Iowa City. (319) 335-1727. Looking Bac: Ferdinand Bac 1859-1952. An artist, writer, and landscape architect, Bac accomplished more in his 93 years than most people could in a lifetime. This exhibition brings together Bac’s drawings and prints and examines his career.  February 17-May 16.

ART CENTER OF BURLINGTON, 301 Jefferson St., Burlington. (319) 754-8069 Land & Light. Plein air paintings by Carlene Atwater, John Preston, and more. Feb. 1–28.

PUBLIC SPACE ONE, 120 N. Dubuque St., lower level of Wesley Building, Iowa City. (319) 331-8893.

OLSON LARSON GALLERIES, 203 5th St, West Des Moines. (515)-277-6734. Of the Earth: New Work by John Beckelman & Ellen Wagener. These Iowa artists are taking visual inspiration and physical materials from the land to create their artwork. February 16-April 7.

IOWA ARTISANS GALLERY. 207 E. Washington, Iowa City. (319) 351-8686.

MARVIN CONE GALLERY. Coe College, 1220 First Avenue NE, Cedar Rapids. (319) 399-8500. 

FAIRFIELD ART ASSOCIATION GALLERY, 200 N. Main St., FACC, Fairfield.

UNITY GALLERY, MUM Library, N. Highway, Fairfield.

CSPS, 1103 3rd St. SE, Cedar Rapids. (319) 364-1530.

JANALYN HANSON WHITE GALLERY. Mount Mercy University, 1330 Elmhurst Dr. NE, Cedar Rapids, IA. (319) 363-8213.

AMERICUS DIAMOND, corner of Main St. and Burlington, Fairfield. Featuring the artwork of Christopher Kufner.

CATICH GALLERY, Galvin Fine Arts Center, St. Ambrose University, 518 W. Locust St., Davenport. 563-333-6444.

ANOMALY GALLERY, 105 N. Court, Ottumwa. (641) 777-8446.

MUSCATINE ART CENTER, 1314 Mulberry Ave., Muscatine. (563) 263-8282.

FORT MADISON ART CENTER, 1314 Mulberry Ave. (319) 372-8780.

DUBUQUE MUSEUM OF ART, 701 Locust St., Dubuque. (563) 557-1851.

INDIAN HILLS ART GALLERY, Indian Hills Community College, Ottumwa. (641) 683-5144.

OCTAGON CENTER FOR THE ARTS, 427 Douglas Ave., Ames. (515) 232-5331.

AMANA ARTS GUILD. 1 block north of Highway 220, High Amana. (319) 622-3678.

SIOUX CITY ART CENTER, 225 Nebraska St., Sioux City. (712) 279-6272. Grant Wood’s Corn Room Mural. The Corn Room mural was one of four murals commissioned by Omaha businessman Eugene Eppley for his hotels in Council Bluffs, Cedar Rapids, Waterloo, and Sioux City. Originally part of the historical Martin Hotel, the Corn Room was created by Grant Wood in 1927, then lost for decades under paint and old wallpaper, only to be rediscovered in 1979. Ongoing.